Hunter Shoots Partial Albino Pheasant

Duluth hunter Clint Moen shot this partial-albino pheasant during a recent trip to North Dakota. The rooster had white pigmentation on its neck, body and wing feathers. Its legs and feet were yellow-ish instead of the usual gray. Albinism in birds is rare. It’s caused, according to researcher Krissy Bush, an avian researcher with the University of Alberta, by a mutation in a gene coding for a pigment-synthesizing enzyme.  Albinism occurs in other birds and in mammals such as deer, too.
Duluth hunter Clint Moen shot this partial-albino pheasant during a recent trip to North Dakota. The rooster had white pigmentation on its neck, body and wing feathers. Its legs and feet were yellowish instead of the usual gray.
Albinism in birds is rare. It’s caused, according to researcher Krissy Bush, an avian researcher with the University of Alberta, by a mutation in a gene coding for a pigment-synthesizing enzyme.
Albinism occurs in other birds and in mammals such as deer, too.

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